Tag Archives: parents

Why A Child Psychologist Can Be An Important Member of Your Family’s Village: An Interview with Dr. Pamela Loman

Discover how to thrive in your relationship & your parenting!

When I first heard the title “pediatric psychologist,” I couldn’t help but think of someone who’s so clinical in their approach they’d have little to offer kids, certainly not the people skills to relate to them. While the moniker “child psychologist” seemed better, I still assumed a link to pathology, to something being very wrong with a child to need those services.

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Dr. Pamela Loman

I was wrong, as confirmed in my interview with child psychologist, Dr. Pamela Loman. Dr. Loman powerfully explains how child psychologists—at least the best ones, among whom I include Dr. Loman—support families through a range of life transitions and challenges, and serve as consultants over the lifespan of a family’s evolution. Dr. Loman works with kids and parents navigating changes that are as commonplace as starting school or welcoming a new baby, or as specific as dealing with the loss of a loved one or exploring a possible medical diagnosis, such as ADHD.

I urge every parent to listen to my interview with Dr. Loman to better understand the broad scope of circumstances for which your family might benefit from consulting with a child psychologist, and to also better comprehend ways in which couples’ dynamics  support, or stifle, children’s psychological and emotional wellbeing. Plus, Dr. Loman offers some great tips for self-care and what to look for in a child psychologist. To download the interview, click the green/white icon on the audio player.

If you live in Sonoma County, check out Dr. Loman’s child psychology practice. Also, learn more about Dr. Loman’s Discovering Joy retreats, which she co-leads with Dr. Nicholas Egan. These are workshops to which you can travel from anywhere!

Discover how to thrive in your relationship & your parenting!

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What “Family Culture” Do You Belong To?

The Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture published a very interesting report last year about American families. The report centers on “telling the complex story of parents’ habits, dispositions, hopes, fears, assumptions, and expectations for their children.” While there’s little in the report, specifically, about parents’ relationships with each other and about co-parenting philosophies,  the  findings are fascinating  not only because of what they tell us about our perceptions of parenting, and of childhood, but also as they impact the environment in which craft our co-parenting efforts and  vision of what parents’ relationships do, or might, or “should” look like. You can find the report here.